Kingston upon Hull War Memorial 1914 - 1918

The story of Hull in World War One

WW1 Hull: facts and figures

Whilst much information about people's deaths was meticulously recorded, in general it wasn't pulled together in the way it has been collected here.  The charts below present a unique insight into the facts and figures.  Use them to show trends as no guarantee as to their exact accuracy  is given.  Additionally we are continuously updating the database and these charts are only a snapshot of the data at a specific moment in time.

 

Dates where more than 50 people died

 

mearchnt Navy vessel deaths

number of men who died each year

number of people who died by age

Number who died at specific ages

postcodes where most people died

ranks of men who died

regiments losing most men from hull

streets where most people died

those under 21 who died

where most people were buried

 

Most common surnames of those who died:

Surname

Number

SMITH

130

BROWN

77

JOHNSON

72

ROBINSON

72

WILSON

71

HARRISON

61

TAYLOR

55

JACKSON

53

THOMPSON

52

WRIGHT

49

CLARK

41

HALL

39

WALKER

38

WATSON

32

RICHARDSON

31

GREEN

30

 

Most common first names of those who died:

First name

Number

WILLIAM

300

GEORGE

234

JOHN

219

THOMAS

206

ARTHUR

191

JAMES

189

JOHN WILLIAM

175

HARRY

173

WALTER

150

ALBERT

140

ERNEST

140

CHARLES

138

HAROLD

132

JOSEPH

119

ALFRED

116

ROBERT

113

 

 

 The 10 most bloodiest battles of World War One  B

loodiest Battles of World War I e

Battle Total Casualties
1. Hundred Day Offensive 1,855,369
2. Spring Offensive 1,539,715
3. Battle of the Somme 1,219,201
4. Battle of Verdun 976,000
5. Battle of Passchendaele 848,614
6. Serbian Campaign 633,500
7. First Battle of Marnes 483,000
8. Battle of Gallipoli 473,000
9. Battle of Arras 278,000
10. Battle of Tannenberg 182,000

 

List of WW1 Casualties

 

Civilian Deaths as a result of direct military action: 950,000

 

Civilian Deaths caused by disease and famine: 6 million

 Country with the most military deaths: Germany (2.1 million)

 

Country with highest total death toll: Russia (3.8 million)

 Highest Percentage of population killed: Serbia (16.11%)

 

250,000 British Soldiers were suffered a partial or full amputation, as a result of fighting in the First World War. 

List of Casualties in WWI

Countries Total Mobilized Killed / Died Wounded Prisoners and Missing Total Casualties Percent of Casualties
Allies
Russia 12,000,000 1,700,000 4,950,000 2,500,000 9,150,000 76.3%
France 8,410,000 1,357,800 4,266,000 537,000 6,160,800 73.3%
British Empire 8,904,467 908,371 2,090,212 191,652 3,190,235 35.8%
Italy 5,615,000 650,000 947,000 600,000 2,197,000 39.1%
United States 4,355,000 116,516 204,002 4,500 323,018 7.1%
Japan 800,00 300 907 3 1,210 0.2%
Romania 750,000 335,706 120,000 80,000 535,706 71.4%
Serbia 707,343 45,000 133,148 152,958 331,106 46.8%
Belgium 267,000 13,716 44,686 34,659 93,061 34.9%
Greece 230,000 5,000 21,000 1,000 17,000 11.7%
Portugal 100,000 7,222 13,751 12,318 33,291 33.3%
Montenegro 50,000 3,000 10,000 7,000 20,000 40.0%
Total 42,1888,810 5,152,115 12,831,004 4,121,090 22,104,209 52.3%
Central Powers
Germany 11,000,000 1,773,700 4,216,058 1,152,800 7,142,558 64.9%
Austria-Hungary 7,800,000 1,200,000 3,620,000 2,200,000 7,020,000 90.0%
Turkey 2,850,000 325,000 400,000 250,000 975,000 34.2%
Bulgaria 1,200,000 87,500 152,390 27,029 266,919 22.2%
Total 22,850,000 3,386,200 8,388,448 3,629,829 15,404,477 67.4%
Grand Total 65,038,810 8,538,315 21,219,452 7,750,919 37,508,686 57.6%

 

 

World War One in Numbers

Seventy-million men from 40 countries, were mobilised to fight around the world, from the trenches of the Western Front to the Middle East and Africa. There were more bullets fired, more bombs dropped, more men killed, more money borrowed and spent than in any war before. 

It was a war of numbers: men, ammunition, food - quantity was the difference between victory and defeat, and for the first time in human history, everything was recorded in exacting detail: 762,000 Britons enlisted in the first four weeks of the war; 980,000 'war' horses shipped to Europe from America; the life expectancy of a WW1 pilot was only 15 flight hours; the cost of bullets for one day of fighting in 1918 was £3,800,000 - in today's money that's £237,500,000. The first World war was the first war fought in the air, the first war to use tanks and the first war to deploy chemical weapons on a mass scale. For the first time, battle wounds accounted for more deaths than disease, until the arrival of the 'Spanis Flu'. By 1918, 60% of US deaths were attributed to flu and more than 40% of the US Navy had fallen ill. Below are some other WW1 facts in numbers:- 

SOLDIERS DIED: 9.7 million

SOLDIERS WOUNDED: 21.2 million

6,500 soldiers, died every day of the war, on average

70% of all battle casualties were caused by artillery weapons.

6.6 million civilians died in the war, including 2 million in Russia alone

Prisoners of War and Missing Soldiers: 7.5 million

240 Men took six hours to build a 250 meter trench.

25,000 miles of trenches dug on the Western Front, enough to encircle the world.

3 million miles of barb wire produced - enough to wrap around the world 140 times

£100 million lent to Britain by America for the war.

2 Billion letters sent between British families and soldiers fighting.

9 million food parcels sent to prisoners of war by the British Red Cross.

627 Servicemen were awarded the Victoria Cross.

185,000 British Troops taken Prisoner.

1 million men shipped back to Britain due to serious illness.

240,000 British Soldiers had limbs amputated.

80,000 British soldiers suffered shell shock.

20,000 British soldiers suffered 'Trench Foot'

100,000 soldiers gassed in fighting.

110,000 tons of poison gas was used, resulting in 500,000 casualties.

6 weeks - life expectancy of a Junior Officer in the trenches

60,000 British Casualties on the the first day of the Battle of the Somme - 1st July 1916.

3,600 British soldiers killed per day in the five month Somme offensive

600 rounds per minute fired by a German machine gun.

150 yards - typical width of 'No-Man's' land.

2,000 British war cemetries on the old Western Front.

53 British villages suffered no war deaths. They were called 'Thankful Villages'

8.9 million British Troops deployed.

30,000 aircraft built by UK factories per year.

8,200 Tanks produced bythe war's end

500,000 carrier pidgeons were used to carry messages along the front.

1 million men enlisted in the British Army by January 1915.

250,000 soldiers lied about their age to enlist in Britain.

1 in seven weeks spent by a British soldier on the front line.

2 weeks a year leave was given to soldiers in the British Army.

5p basic daily pay for soldiers.

16,000 Conscientious Objectors refused to fight.

11 German Spies were executed by Britsih authorities.

1.5 million Armenians were killed by Turkey's Ottoman Empire in genocide.

3.5 million standard Lee Enfield rifles were built in Britain. 

5,554 Allied ships were sunk by U-Boats.

190,000 mines laid in waters around Britain.

1 billion artillery shells fired on the Western Front.

50 billion bullets fired.

1 million machine guns produced.

1 tonne of explosives fired, per square meter, of Western Front territory.

812 tonnes of cordite produced per week in Gretna factory, Scotland.

160 tonnes of munitions found in the fields on the old Ypres front in 2012.

400 female factory workers died from over exposure to TNT explosives.

6,000 Belgium civilians killed in 1914 by the German army.

200,000 Belgian refugees came to Britain.

557 people killed by German Zeppelin raids.

3 million acres of farmland created in Britain to prevent famine.

1,000  Daily average caloric intake for German adult civilians Jan 1918.

103 German airship and bomber raids on Great Britain.

675 Allied air raids on Germany

1.3 million Indian troops served in the war, including 100,000 Sikhs, 800,000 Hindu troops and 400,000 Muslims. 62,060 were killed in action. More than 1,000 of them lost their lives at Gallipoli and nearly 700,000 sepoys fought in Mesopotamia. 8 VC's were won by the Indian Army.

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10 surprising Laws passed in the First World War.

The outbreak of war in 1914 brought many new rules and regulations to Britain. The most important of these was the Defence of the Realm Act (DORA), passed on 8 August 1914 ‘for securing public safety’. DORA gave the government the power to prosecute anybody whose actions were deemed to ‘jeopardise the success of the operations of His Majesty’s forces or to assist the enemy’. This gave the act a very wide interpretation. It regulated virtually every aspect of the British home front and was expanded as the war went on. Here are a few of the surprising measures introduced by DORA - some of which still affect life in Britain today.

1. WhistlingWhistling for London taxis was banned in case it should be mistaken for an air raid warning.

2. Loitering. People were forbidden to loiter near bridges and tunnels or to light bonfires.

3. Clocks Go ForwardBritish Summer Time was instituted in May 1916 to maximise working hours in the day, particularly in agriculture.

4. DrinkingClaims that war production was being hampered by drunkenness led to pub opening times and alcohol strength being reduced. The ‘No treating order’ also made it an offence to buy drinks for others.

5. DrugsPossession of cocaine or opium, other than by authorised professionals such as doctors, became a criminal offence.

6 BlackoutsA blackout was introduced in certain towns and cities to protect against air raids.

7. Press CensorshipPress censorship was introduced, severely limiting the reporting of war news. Many publications were also banned. 

8. Postal CensorshipPrivate correspondence was also censored. Military censors examined 300,000 private telegrams in 1916 alone.

9. White Flour. Fines were issued for making white flour instead of wholewheat and for allowing rats to invade wheat stores. Further restrictions on food production eventually led to the introduction of rationing in 1918.

10. Foreign Nationals. DORA put restrictions on the movement of foreign nationals from enemy countries. The freedom of such ‘aliens’ was severely restricted, with many interned.